COVID-19

Definitions of essential building work

As part of the government’s COVID-19 Level 4 alert, staff at Chamberlain Carpentry & Joinery have been required to stop all building work after Wednesday 25 March and to go into self-isolation with their household members.

At present we are not allowed to carry on with any of our current building projects. Any work required during the four week shutdown must meet the Government’s criteria which can be found at: https://www.building.govt.nz/covid-19

The following information has been taken from the Building Performance website (Wed 25 March - 2pm). It will help you (and us) ascertain if any work you contact us about is considered essential and allowed during the shutdown period. (Please note these defenitions are being constantly updated by the Government.)

“The definition of an essential business for the building and construction sector from the COVID-19 Website is:

  • Any entity involved in building and construction related to essential services and critical infrastructure
  • Any entity involved in building and construction required immediately to maintain human health and safety at home or work
  • Any entity that performs or is involved in building and resource consenting necessary for the above purposes.

To further clarify this definition, an essential business is:

  • Any entity or occupation involved in the supply of electricity, gas, water, waste water (sanitation), or
  • Any entity or occupation involved in building and construction required immediately to maintain human health and safety at home or work
  • Any entity that has regulatory responsibilities in relation to building consenting and compliance and resource consenting necessary for the above purposes.

… Under a level 4 alert, only trades people undertaking work related to essential business or infrastructure are expected to be working outside of the self-isolation protocol. The exception to this may be where tradespeople are required to undertake emergency work where the need is immediate and required to maintain human health and safety. Situations might include:

  • The repair or replacement of a failed hot water cylinder required for sanitation purposes
  • The unblocking and repair or replacement of sanitary waste or water supply pipes to maintain human health and safety
  • The repair or replacement of electrical installations or equipment where there is an immediate threat to the human health and safety
  • The securing of roof or structure where there is an immediate threat to human health and safety

Examples of non-emergency work would be:

  • Finishing the lining of a client's house
  • Pouring a concrete slab to get ahead while the country is in lockdown
  • Replacing tap washers
  • Routine servicing of non-essential equipment or infrastructure
  • Replacement of sanitary fixtures that are working.”

Because the situation is developing so rapidly the above definitions may change. You can visit the following webpage for the most up to date information:

https://covid19.govt.nz/government-actions/covid-19-alert-level/#essential-businesses

Thank you from Ian and the Team